Volume 4 (2018)

“Was it Diegetic, or Just a Dream? Music’s Paradoxical Place in the Film Inception

Christopher Doll (Rutgers University)
Volume 4.1 (April 2018)

 

Between “diegetic” film music (heard by the characters) and “nondiegetic” film music (heard only by the audience) is a paradoxical space called the “fantastical gap.” A film such as Inception (2010) makes traversal of this gap into an overt theme, obscuring our sense of place to such a degree that even the literal plot of the movie is open to interpretation, and thus also illustrating the extent to which filmmakers can manipulate an audience’s understanding of the filmic world through the blurring of the diegetic/nondiegetic divide.

 


“Anne Young’s Musical Games (1801): Music Theory, Gender, and Game Design”

Carmel Raz (Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics) Volume 4.2 (September 2018)

 

In 1801, the Scottish music theorist Anne Young (1756-1827) created an elaborate board game set designed to teach musical fundamentals. This video offers some thoughts on the creation and reception of her works, contextualizing their creation and reception within the history of education in late eighteenth century Britain.

Keywords: history of music theory, history of music pedagogy, educational games, women in music theory

 


Anne Young’s Introduction to Music (1803): Pedagogical, Speculative, and Ludic Music Theory

Carmel Raz (Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics) Volume 4.3 (October 2018)

 

Though ostensibly designed to explain a set of pedagogical games geared toward children, An Introduction to Music (1803)—a treatise by the Scottish music theorist Anne Young (1756-1827)—advances some intriguing ideas that touch on advanced music theoretic concepts. This video explores these concepts, along with impact of the author’s gender on the nature and reception of her treatise.

Keywords: history of music theory, history of music pedagogy, educational games, women in music theory

 


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